BRAVE NEW WORLD HUXLEY QUOTES

“Community, Identity, Stability” – The World State’s motto, emphasizing the importance of conformity and control.

“Actual happiness always looks pretty squalid in comparison with the overcompensations for misery. And, of course, stability isn’t nearly so spectacular as instability. And being contented has none of the glamour of a good fight against misfortune.” – Mustapha Mond, questioning the idea of true happiness.

“But I don’t want comfort. I want God, I want poetry, I want real danger, I want freedom, I want goodness. I want sin.” – John the Savage, expressing his desire for a more authentic and meaningful existence.

“Universal happiness keeps the wheels steadily turning; truth and beauty can’t.” – Mustapha Mond, explaining the sacrifices made for stability and control.

“Words can be like X-rays, if you use them properly – they’ll go through anything. You read and you’re pierced.” – Helmholtz Watson, highlighting the power of language to challenge and provoke thought.

“You’ve got to choose between happiness and what people used to call high art. We’ve sacrificed the high art.” – Helmholtz Watson, discussing the trade-off between happiness and intellectual depth.

“One believes things because one has been conditioned to believe them” – Mustapha Mond, highlighting the theme of conditioning and indoctrination in the novel.

“A gramme is better than a damn” – Lenina Crowe, reflecting the conditioning that prioritizes pleasure and escapism over critical thinking.

“Actual happiness always looks pretty squalid in comparison with the overcompensations for misery. And, of course, stability isn’t nearly so spectacular as instability. And being contented has none of the glamour of a good fight against misfortune.” – Mustapha Mond, suggesting that true happiness is not as glamorous as the distractions and superficial pleasures offered by the World State.

“We have created a society where there is stability because everyone is happy and no one wants to change anything. But stability means stagnation.” – John the Savage, critiquing the World State’s emphasis on stability at the expense of progress.

“Ending is better than mending.” – World State slogan, promoting consumerism and waste as a means to maintain economic stability.

“God isn’t compatible with machinery and scientific medicine and universal happiness.” – John the Savage, lamenting the loss of spirituality and meaningful connection in the World State.

“I claim them all,” said the Savage at last. – A statement by John the Savage, indicating his rejection of the World State’s limiting values and desires. HENRY FORD QUOTE WHETHER YOU BELIEVE YOU CAN

“I want to feel what I feel. Even if it’s not happiness, I’d rather feel it.” – Lenina Crowe, expressing her dissatisfaction with the superficial happiness of the World State.

“The world’s stable now. People are happy; they get what they want, and they never want what they can’t get. They’re well off; they’re safe; they’re never ill; they’re not afraid of death; they’re blissfully ignorant of passion and old age; they’re plagued with no mothers or fathers; they’ve got no wives, or children, or lovers to feel strongly about; they’re so conditioned that they practically can’t help behaving as they ought to behave.” – Mustapha Mond, describing the carefully-controlled and superficial existence of the World State.

“We were keeping our eye on 198 When the year came and the prophecy didn’t, thoughtful Americans sang softly in praise of themselves. The roots of liberal democracy had held. Wherever else the terror had happened, we, at least, had not been visited by Orwellian nightmares.” – Mustapha Mond, alluding to George Orwell’s dystopian novel while highlighting the complacency and ignorance of the World State’s citizens.

“Feeling lurks in that interval of time between desire and its consummation. Shorten that interval, break down all those old unnecessary barriers.” – Mustapha Mond, advocating for the immediacy and gratification of desire in the World State.

“You’re claiming the right to be unhappy.” – Mustapha Mond, challenging John the Savage’s rejection of the World State’s happiness-focused society.

“Everyone belongs to everyone else.” – Lenina Crowe, expressing the World State’s emphasis on communal ownership and sexual promiscuity.

“Everyone’s happy nowadays.” – World State slogan, symbolizing the pervasive mindless pleasure and conformity enforced by the state.

“It’s not the fashionable hour for pain.” – Mustapha Mond, reflecting on the World State’s aversion to suffering and discomfort.

“Till at last the child’s mind is these suggestions, and the sum of the suggestions is the child’s mind.” – Narrator, discussing the process of conditioning and shaping young minds in the World State.

“The world’s stable now. People are happy; they get what they want, and they never want what they can’t get.” – Mustapha Mond, highlighting the World State’s success in ensuring instant gratification and avoiding feelings of longing or dissatisfaction.

“All the same, they’re individuals. But individuals who’ve lost their individuality.” – Mustapha Mond, reflecting on the homogenization and loss of individuality in the World State’s society.

“The aim of the normal child’s education is to develop in him a state of happy conformity – a harmony between the facts of his existence and his inborn capacities.” – Mustapha Mond, emphasizing the World State’s focus on conditioning individuals to fit seamlessly into their predetermined roles and desires.