ENGLISH MACBETH QUOTES AND ANALYSIS

“Fair is foul and foul is fair.” – This quote, spoken by the witches in Act 1, Scene 1, reflects the theme of deception throughout the play. It suggests that appearances can be deceiving, and that what seems fair or good may actually be wicked or evil.

“Stars, hide your fires; let not light see my black and deep desires.” – In Act 1, Scene 4, Macbeth utters these words after hearing that King Duncan has named Malcolm as his successor. It shows Macbeth’s ambition and his willingness to hide his immoral intentions in order to achieve his goals.

“If it were done when ’tis done, then ’twere well it were done quickly.” – Macbeth says this in Act 1, Scene 7, contemplating the murder of King Duncan. It demonstrates his impatience and eagerness to act upon his dark desires without considering the consequences.

“Is this a dagger which I see before me, the handle toward my hand?” – In Act 2, Scene 1, Macbeth sees a hallucination of a bloody dagger before him, symbolizing his internal conflict and the physical harm he is about to commit.

“Out, damned spot! Out, I say!… What, will these hands ne’er be clean?” – In Act 5, Scene 1, Lady Macbeth’s guilt manifests in her sleepwalking, and she desperately tries to wash away the imaginary bloodstains on her hands. This quote highlights the psychological torment she experiences as a result of her involvement in Duncan’s murder.

“Double, double toil and trouble; Fire burn and caldron bubble.” – The witches chant these famous words in Act 4, Scene 1 during the creation of their spell. This quote emphasizes their supernatural abilities and the chaotic nature of their actions.

“By the pricking of my thumbs, something wicked this way comes.” – In Act 4, Scene 1, the second witch speaks this line upon sensing Macbeth’s approach. It foreshadows Macbeth’s impending arrival and serves as a symbol of his sinister nature.

“To-morrow, and to-morrow, and to-morrow, creeps in this petty pace from day to day.” – Macbeth utters this famous soliloquy in Act 5, Scene 5 after learning of Lady Macbeth’s death. It reflects his bleak outlook on life and the feeling of emptiness that pervades his existence.

“Out, out, brief candle! Life’s but a walking shadow, a poor player that struts and frets his hour upon the stage, and then is heard no more.” – Macbeth speaks these words in Act 5, Scene 5 upon hearing of Lady Macbeth’s death. It signifies his realization of the fleeting nature of life and the ultimate futility of his actions.

“All the perfumes of Arabia will not sweeten this little hand.” – Lady Macbeth says this in Act 5, Scene 1, expressing her guilt and regret over their murderous deeds. It reflects her inability to cleanse herself from the bloodstains of their crimes.

“Yet do I fear thy nature; It is too full o’ th’ milk of human kindness to catch the nearest way.” – Lady Macbeth speaks these words in Act 1, Scene 5, regarding Macbeth’s lack of ruthless ambition. She believes he is too compassionate to pursue his desire for power through immoral means.

“I bear a charmed life.” – Macbeth says this in Act 5, Scene 8 before his final battle. It demonstrates his arrogance and belief in his invincibility, which ultimately leads to his downfall. HARD WORK FOOTBALL QUOTES

“By the pricking of my thumbs, something wicked this way comes.” – In Act 4, Scene 1, the second witch speaks this line upon sensing Macbeth’s approach. It foreshadows Macbeth’s impending arrival and serves as a symbol of his sinister nature.

“Will all great Neptune’s ocean wash this blood clean from my hand?” – Macbeth says this in Act 2, Scene 2 after Duncan’s murder. It reflects his guilt and the realization that he cannot escape the consequences of his actions.

“To know my deed, ’twere best not know myself.” – In Act 2, Scene 2, Macbeth speaks this line after murdering Duncan. It demonstrates his desire to disconnect from his own conscience and suppress his feelings of guilt.

“There’s daggers in men’s smiles.” – Donalbain says this in Act 2, Scene 3 after his father’s murder. It reveals his suspicion towards others and the realization that everyone is a potential threat.

“I have no spur to prick the sides of my intent, but only vaulting ambition.” – Macbeth says this in Act 1, Scene 7, contemplating the murder of King Duncan. It reveals his ambition as his sole motivator, suggesting that he lacks any justifiable reason to commit such an act.

“All hail, Macbeth! Hail to thee, Thane of Cawdor!” – The witches prophesy this to Macbeth in Act 1, Scene It marks the beginning of his descent into madness and his obsession with fulfilling the prophecies.

“Fair is foul, and foul is fair; Hover through the fog and filthy air.” – The witches chant these words at the beginning of the play. It sets the tone for the play’s themes of deception and moral ambiguity.

“So foul and fair a day I have not seen.” – Macbeth utters this line in Act 1, Scene 3, after hearing the witches’ prophecies. It reveals his internal conflict and uncertainty regarding the implications of the witches’ words.

“Come, you spirits that tend on mortal thoughts, unsex me here.” – Lady Macbeth says this in Act 1, Scene 5, calling upon supernatural forces to strip her of her femininity and make her more ruthless. It reflects her desire for power and her willingness to abandon traditional gender roles.

“I have supped full with horrors.” – Macbeth says this in Act 5, Scene 5, lamenting the atrocities he has committed. It showcases his guilt and despair as he reflects on the consequences of his actions.