QUOTES FROM FRANKENSTEIN ABOUT VICTOR HATING THE MONSTER

“I felt the bitterest sensations of despondence and mortification… I had formed no supposition concerning its nature and origin; but I did not marvel that, a being such as the one I had described, should be hateful to mankind.”

“Nothing in human shape could have destroyed that fair child. He was the murderer! I could not doubt it. The mere presence of the idea was an irresistible proof of the fact.”

“Accursed creator! Why did you form a monster so hideous that even you turned from me in disgust?”

“I continued for the remainder of the day in my hovel in a state of utter and stupid despair. My protectors had departed, and had broken the sole link that held me to the world.”

“I, who had ever been surrounded by amiable companions, continually engaged in endeavoring to bestow mutual pleasure—I was now alone. In the university whither I was going, I must form my own friends and be my own protector.”

“How dare you sport thus with life? Do your duty towards me and I will do mine towards you and the rest of mankind.”

“I was assaulted by a thousand fears and kinds of imagination. It was not joy only that possessed me, but a wild rage and an insatiable revenge.”

“I could not feel pain, but I sank into a bottomless gulf, and felt the bitterness of disappointment turn to gall within me.”

“I was now alone. Friendless and drove, I knew not where.”

“I was too weak even to release myself from the hold of the fiend…the remorseless infliction of pain and fear.”

“Devil…you reproach me with your creation; come on, then, that I may extinguish the spark which I so negligently bestowed.”

“I expected this reception. All men hate the wretched; how, then, must I be hated, who am miserable beyond all living things!”

“Hateful day when I received life! (…) Accursed creator! Why did you form a monster so hideous that even you turned from me in disgust?” INTERNATIONAL BOOK GIVING DAY QUOTES

“I could not conceive how one man could go forth to murder his fellow, or even why there were laws and governments; but when I heard details of vice and bloodshed, my wonder ceased, and I turned away with disgust and loathing.”

“Once I falsely hoped to meet with beings who, pardoning my outward form, would love me for the excellent qualities which I was capable of bringing forth.”

“Know that, one by one, my friends were snatched away; I was left desolate. (…) I was alone.”

“Yet when she died! Nay, then I was not miserable. I had cast off all feeling, subdued all anguish, to riot in the excess of my despair. Evil thenceforth became my good.”

“Remember that I am thy creature; I ought to be thy Adam, but I am rather the fallen angel.”

“The agony of my feelings allowed me no respite; no incident occurred from which my rage and misery could not extract its food.”

“Life and death appeared to me ideal bounds, which I should first break through, and pour a torrent of light into our dark world.”

“I could with pleasure have destroyed the cottage and its inhabitants, and have glutted myself with their shrieks and misery.”

“I ought to be thy Adam, but I am rather the fallen angel, whom thou drivest from joy for no misdeed.”

“I was benevolent and good; misery made me a fiend.”

“I had committed deeds of mischief beyond description horrible, and more, much more, I persuaded myself, was yet behind.”

“I was still incensed by the words of Felix: ‘I, too, can create desolation; my enemy is not invulnerable; this death will carry despair to him, and a thousand other miseries shall torment and destroy him.”