THEIR EYES WERE WATCHING GOD FEMINISM QUOTES

“She stood there until something fell off the shelf inside her. Then her tears began to flow”

(Chapter 1) – This quote represents Janie’s realization of her own identity and liberation from societal expectations.

“Ah done lived Grandma’s way, now Ah means tuh live mine.”

(Chapter 2) – Janie asserts her determination to break free from traditional roles and seek her own path.

“She had an inside and an outside now and suddenly she knew how not to mix them”

(Chapter 2) – Janie learns to separate her public and private selves, reclaiming control over her own narrative.

“She had an inside and an outside now and suddenly she knew how not to mix them”

(Chapter 2) – Janie learns to separate her public and private selves, reclaiming control over her own narrative.

“It was her image of Jody tumbled down and shattered. But looking at it she saw that it never was the flesh and blood figure of her dreams. Just something she had grabbed up to drape her dreams over”

(Chapter 8) – Janie realizes that her idealized notions of love and romance were based on societal expectations rather than genuine connections.

“She was saving up feelings for some man she had never seen. She had an inside and an outside now and suddenly she knew how not to mix them”

(Chapter 9) – Janie recognizes that her strength and independence are not dependent on finding a man and instead focuses on her own growth and self-discovery.

“Two things everybody’s got tuh do fuh themselves. They got tuh go tuh God, and they got tuh find out about livin’ fuh theyselves”

(Chapter 14) – Janie emphasizes the importance of personal spiritual exploration and self-empowerment.

“Love is lak de sea. It’s uh movin’ thing, but still and all, it takes its shape from de shore it meets, and it’s different with every shore”

(Chapter 16) – Janie rejects the idea of love and relationships being fixed or predetermined by society, emphasizing the importance of individuality and personal experiences.

“She knew now that marriage did not make love. Janie’s first dream was dead, so she became a woman”

(Chapter 18) – Janie recognizes that love and marriage are not always synonymous and asserts her own agency and growth as a woman.

“Their Eyes Were Watching God”

(Chapter 18) – The title itself suggests the idea of women reclaiming their own narratives and finding their own voices.

“She was gone after bigger game” FUNNY HOMESCHOOL QUOTES

(Chapter 19) – Janie’s departure from her second husband, Tea Cake, represents her pursuit of personal happiness and fulfillment outside of societal expectations.

“She had found a new love for herself. Something she had never had before”

(Chapter 20) – Janie’s self-discovery and realization of her own worth emphasizes the importance of self-love and self-acceptance for women.

“It was her soul that kissed his lips”

(Chapter 20) – Janie’s deep emotional connection with Tea Cake transcends societal norms and customs of love, highlighting the power of true intimacy.

“They sat in company with the others in other shanties, their eyes straining against crude walls and their souls asking if He meant to measure their puny might against His”

(Chapter 20) – This quote highlights the shared struggles and resilience of all women, inviting readers to question societal standards and expectations.

“Two things everybody’s got tuh do fuh theyselves. They got tuh go tuh God, and they got tuh find out about livin’ fuh theyselves”

(Chapter 20) – Janie’s emphasis on personal spiritual exploration and self-discovery reinforces the feminist theme of individual empowerment.

“She called in her soul to come and see”

(Chapter 20) – Janie’s calling on her soul to witness her life signifies her desire for inner fulfillment and authenticity.

“Janie saw her life like a great tree in leaf with the things suffered, things enjoyed, things done and undone”

(Chapter 20) – Janie’s self-reflection on her journey acknowledges the complexities and growth that come from embracing personal experiences.

“She had been offered to the world, but it had refused her”

(Chapter 20) – This quote highlights the societal rejection faced by Janie when she defied societal norms, illustrating the struggles women face in patriarchal societies.

“Janie had come back from burying the dead. The sadness of the loss had been gone from her face”

(Chapter 20) – Janie’s resilience and ability to overcome hardship represents feminist strength and the capacity for growth and transformation.

“So she sat on the porch and watched the moon rise. Soon its amber fluid was drenching the earth, and quenching the thirst of the day”

(Chapter 20) – This closing scene shows Janie finding peace and contentment after her journey of self-discovery, symbolizing a triumph of feminism and personal liberation.